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Texas Med Spa FAQ

What is a med spa?

The American Med Spa Association defines a medical spa as a hybrid between an aesthetic medical center and a day spa” with four core elements: (1) the provision of non-invasive (i.e. non-surgical) aesthetic medical services; (2) under the general supervision of a licensed physician; (3) performed by trained, experienced and qualified practitioners; (4) with onsite supervision by a licensed healthcare professional. AmSpa – Med Spa FAQ

While that definition is technically accurate, it obscures the point that because med spas offer medical services, they are considered medical practices in Texas and must comply with the rules and regulations that apply to traditional doctor’s offices.

What kinds of services do med spas offer?

In addition to providing aesthetic cosmetic treatments common in many spa settings, med spas provide services that cross the line into the practice of medicine. A small sample of these services include:

  • Laser Hair Removal
  • Botox injections and other dermal fillers
  • IV infusions
  • Platelet-Rich Plasma injections
  • Hormone therapy
  • Cosmetic surgeries

The Texas Medical Board refers to these types of services as Nonsurgical Medical Cosmetic Procedures and requires that an appropriately trained physician, or properly supervised midlevel practitioner, perform an appropriate patient assessment and issue an order for the medical cosmetic procedure. Title 22, Texas Administrative Code, Section 193.17, Nonsurgical Medical Cosmetic Procedures

What legal structure must med spas have?

Because med spas are medical practices, they must follow the requirements of Texas law regarding professional entities. Medical practices can only be structured as professional limited liability companies (PLLC) or professional associations (PA). Texas Business Organizations Code, Section 301.003(3)

They may not be formed as corporations or regular limited liability companies (LLC).

Who can own a med spa?

Medical services can only be offered through professional entities owned by physicians. Texas Business Organizations Code, Sec. 301.004, 006-007 In certain circumstances, non-physicians can co-own a medical practice with the physician. The only allowances are for podiatrists, chiropractors, optometrists, and sometimes physician assistants. Texas Business Organizations Code, Sec. 301.012

That means that nurse practitioners or unlicensed persons cannot form a “partnership” with physicians to own a med spa. Said another way, unless you are a physician, chiropractor, optometrist podiatrist, or physician assistant (in limited situations), you cannot own a med spa. This too is a violation of the Corporate Practice of Medicine.

Can a non-physician co-own a med spa with the physician?

In certain circumstances, non-physicians can co-own a medical practice with the physician. The only allowances are for podiatrists, chiropractors, optometrists, and sometimes physician assistants. Texas Business Organizations Code, Sec. 301.012 That means that nurse practitioners, registered nurses, estheticians, or unlicensed persons cannot form a “partnership” with physicians to own a med spa. Said another way, unless you are a physician, chiropractor, optometrist podiatrist, or physician assistant (in limited situations), you cannot own a med spa. This too is a violation of the Corporate Practice of Medicine.

Can a dentist be the “medical director” of a med spa?

I’ve seen mention that the Texas State Board of Dental Examiners allows dentists to use Botox for dental esthetic and dental therapeutic purposes. I cannot confirm that policy, but it would not be surprising as there are several therapeutic dental uses for Botox: high lip lines, Temporomandibular Joint Disorder, Bruxism, and dentures no longer fitting due to shifting jaw muscles. However, Botox for facial cosmetic purposes would not be in a dentist’s scope of practice.

In my view, dentists can only prescribe Botox and fillers for dental purposes. I do not think dentists can provide Botox for purely cosmetic purposes. The other issue is that since cosmetic Botox is a medical service, and dentists are not medical doctors, they cannot own or co-own a medical practice. Neither are dentists qualified to serve as “Medical Director” since they are not licensed to practice medicine in Texas.

What are some of the risks of a non-compliant med spa?

It is a violation of Texas’s Corporate Practice of Medicine doctrine for corporations or standard LLCs to provide medical services. Doing so could bring civil and criminal penalties. Texas Occupations Code, (Medical Practice Act), including sections 155.001, .003, 157.001, 164.052(a)(8),(13), and 165.001, .051, .101, .151, .156

Is the physician required to be on-site or at mid-level required to be on-site?

Either the midlevel or the physician can do the good-faith exam via telehealth or in person. They must be the ones to write the order for the medical procedure.